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Water Science & Technology Vol 52 No 8 pp 151–159 © IWA Publishing 2005

Excess propagation and biological control of zooplanktonic Cyclops in drinking water sources

F.-Y. Cui*, T. Lin**, D.-M. Liu*** and L.-Q. Zhang****

*School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Box 2603, Harbin, 150090, P. R. China, (E-mail: cuifuyi@public.hr.hi.cn)
**School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Box 2603, Harbin, 150090, P. R. China, (E-mail: cuifuyi@public.hr.hi.cn)
***School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Box 2603, Harbin, 150090, P. R. China, (E-mail: cuifuyi@public.hr.hi.cn)
****School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Box 2603, Harbin, 150090, P. R. China, (E-mail: cuifuyi@public.hr.hi.cn)


ABSTRACT
Starting with the occurrence of Cyclops in drinking water sources and its danger to drinking water safety, we extensively investigated the nature of its excess propagation by analyzing the effect of living space and predator pressure in the food chain on its survival. Then we developed an ecological project using fish biomanipulation, different to the conventional fishery culture technique, to control excess propagation of Cyclops. The control effects on Cyclops of four species of fish were investigated experimentally at a stocking density of 30 g/m3 of water. Results showed that the food habit of the fish had a significant influence on the biological control of Cyclops. The propagation of Cyclops could be controlled effectively and also the water quality improved simultaneously by stocking filter-feeding fish, such as silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis). However, herbivorous Ctenopharyngodon idellus and omnivorous Cyprinus carpio had no obvious biological effects on controlling the growth of Cyclops and restoring water quality. The results further proved that under conditions of proper poly-culture densities of silver carp and bighead carp, the number of Cyclops might be controlled at very low levels and eutrophication might be abated by removing nutrients from the water body. Keywords Cyclops; zooplankton; eutrophication; biomanipulation; food habit; fish

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