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Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development Vol 4 No 1 pp 159–163 This paper is in the public domain: verbatim copying and redistribution of this paper are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the paper's original DOI. Anyone using the paper is requested to properly cite and acknowledge the source as Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development 4(1), 159–163. doi:10.2166/washdev.2013.089

Development of Haiti's rural water, sanitation and hygiene workforce

Brian Hubbard, Gabriella Lockhart, Richard J. Gelting and Fabienne Bertrand

Environmental Health Services Branch, National Center for Environmental Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, 4770 Buford Highway, NE., MS F-58, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA E-mail: bnh5@cdc.gov
Environmental Health Services Branch, National Center for Environmental Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, 33 Pond Avenue, Unit 711, Brookline, MA 02445, USA
Health Systems Reconstruction Team, Emergency Response and Recovery Branch, Division for Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, MS A-05, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
National Directorate of Potable Water and Sanitation, 4, Angle Rue Métellus et Route Ibo Lélé, Pétion-Ville, Haiti


ABSTRACT

In 2009 the Haitian Directorate of Potable Water and Sanitation (DINEPA) identified an inadequately trained and under-staffed rural workforce as one of their main institutional challenges. Plans to address this challenge were impacted by the devastating earthquake of January 12, 2010 and the cholera outbreak of October 2010, both of which further complicated Haiti's already poor water and sanitation conditions. Recognizing the importance of DINEPA's institutional priorities, donor and technical assistance groups provided needed support to improve the country's conditions and build the rural water and sanitation workforce. This report describes how DINEPA and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collaborated to design and implement a training program for 264 potable water and sanitation technicians for rural areas. The paper also describes the initial field activities of the newly trained technicians and the immediate impact of their work in the rural water, sanitation and hygiene sector.

Keywords: cholera; Haiti; sanitation and hygiene; water quality; water; workforce development


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